Journal article

The effect of maternal immunisation during pregnancy on infant vaccine responses

  • Zimmermann, Petra Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia - Department of Paediatrics, Fribourg Hospital HFR and Faculty of Science and Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Perrett, Kirsten P. Food Allergy Research Group and Melbourne Children's Trial Centre, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia - Departments of Allergy and Immunology and General Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia
  • Messina, Nicole L. Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia
  • Donatha, Susan Infectious Diseases Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia
  • Ritz, Nicole Infectious Diseases Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Unit, University of Basel Children's Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
  • Klis, Fiona R. M. van der Laboratory for Infectious Diseases and Screening, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands
  • Curtis, Nigel Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Unit, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Parkville, Australia - Infectious Diseases Research Group, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Australia
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    01.08.2019
Published in:
  • EClinicalMedicine. - 2019, vol. 13, p. 21–30
English Immunisation during pregnancy to protect infants against tetanus, pertussis and influenza is recommended in many countries. However, maternal antibodies can interfere with infant vaccine responses. We investigated the effect of antenatal diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) and trivalent inactivated influenza (TIV) immunisation on specific and heterologous antibody responses to routine immunisations given in the first year of life.Methods: In total, 471 healthy infants were included. At 7 and 13 months of age, antibodies to the primary course of routine vaccines given at 6 weeks, 4 and 6 months of age (pertussis (pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (PRN)), polio (type 1, 2, 3), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), pneumococcus (serotype 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F, 23F)) were measured, and at 13 months of age, antibodies to the 12-month routine vaccines (Hib, meningococcus C, measles, mumps and rubella). The seroprotection rates for each vaccine and the geometric mean concentrations (GMC) of antibodies were compared between infants whose mothers did or did not receive dTpa or TIV immunisation during pregnancy.Results: A total of 369 infants were included in the final analysis. Maternal dTpa immunisation was associated with reduced antibody responses to both specific (diphtheria and pertussis) and heterologous (polio and pneumococcus) vaccine antigens. This effect was stronger for persistence of antibodies at 13 months of age than it was at 7 months of age. At 7 months of age, adjusted average antibody concentrations were significantly lower for diphtheria, pertussis (PT, FHA, PRN) and polio type 2, and at 13 months of age, for diphtheria, pertussis (PT, FHA, PRN), polio type 1–3 and pneumococcal serotypes 1, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 18C and 23F. Additionally, at 13 months of age, seroprotection rates for diphtheria, PT, pneumococcal serotype 1, 6A and 6B were significantly lower in infants after maternal dTpa immunisation. In contrast, for Hib, in infants with maternal dTpa immunisation, the adjusted average antibody concentration and the seroprotection rate were higher, particularly at 7 months of age. Maternal TIV immunisation had minimal effect on infant vaccine responses.Conclusion: Whilst maternal immunisation protects infants in the first few months of life, it might interfere with both specific and heterologous (unrelated) vaccines responses in infants.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Master en médecine
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/308413
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