Journal article

Standing economy: does the heterogeneity in the energy cost of posture maintenance reside in differential patterns of spontaneous weight-shifting?

  • Miles-Chan, Jennifer L. Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Fares, Elie-Jacques Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Berkachy, Redina Department of InformaticsUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Jacquet, Philippe Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland - Department of Plant Molecular BiologyUniversity of Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Isacco, Laurie EA3920 and EPSI Platform, Bourgogne Franche-Comté University Besançon, France
  • Schutz, Yves Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Montani, Jean-Pierre Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Dulloo, Abdul G. Department of Medicine/PhysiologyUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
Show more…
    01.04.2017
Published in:
  • European Journal of Applied Physiology. - 2017, vol. 117, no. 4, p. 795–807
English Due to sedentarity-associated disease risks, there is much interest in methods to increase low-intensity physical activity. In this context, it is widely assumed that altering posture allocation can modify energy expenditure (EE) to impact body-weight regulation and health. However, we have recently shown the existence of two distinct phenotypes pertaining to the energy cost of standing—with most individuals having no sustained increase in EE during steady-state standing relative to sitting comfortably. Here, we investigated whether these distinct phenotypes are related to the presence/absence of spontaneous “weight-shifting”, i.e. the redistribution of body- weight from one foot to the other.Methods: Using indirect calorimetry to measure EE in young adults during sitting and 10 min of steady-state standing, we examined: (i) heterogeneity in EE during standing (n = 36); (ii) EE and spontaneous weight-shifting patterns (n = 18); (iii) EE during spontaneous weight-shifting versus experimentally induced weight-shifting (n = 7), and; (iv) EE during spontaneous weight-shifting versus intermittent leg/body displacement (n = 6).Results: Despite heterogeneity in EE response to steady-state standing, no differences were found in the amount or pattern of spontaneous weight-shifting between the two phenotypes. Whilst experimentally induced weight-shifting resulted in a mean EE increase of only 11% (range: 0–25%), intermittent leg/body displacement increased EE to >1.5 METs in all participants.Conclusions: Although the variability in spontaneous weight-shifting signatures between individuals does not appear to underlie heterogeneity in the energy cost of standing posture maintenance, these studies underscore the fact that leg/body displacement, rather than standing posture alone, is needed to increase EE above the currently defined sedentary threshold.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Médecine
Language
  • English
Classification
Nutrition and Dietetics
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/305621
Statistics

Document views: 8 File downloads:
  • dull_sed.pdf: 1