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The Green Lean Amine Machine : Harvesting Electric Power While Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Breath

  • Kalkus, Trevor J. Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
  • Guha, Anirvan Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
  • Scholten, Philip B. V. Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
  • Nagornii, Dimitrii Radboud University, Houtlaan 4, Nijmegen, 6525 XZ Netherlands
  • Coskun, Ali Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 9, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
  • Ianiro, Alessandro Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
  • Mayer, Michael Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Chemin des Verdiers 4, Fribourg, 1700 Switzerland
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    2021
Published in:
  • Advanced Science. - 2021, p. 2100995
English As wearable technologies redefine the way people exchange information, receive entertainment, and monitor health, the development of sustainable power sources that capture energy from the user's everyday activities garners increasing interest. Electric fishes, such as the electric eel and the torpedo ray, provide inspiration for such a power source with their ability to generate massive discharges of electricity solely from the metabolic processes within their bodies. Inspired by their example, the device presented in this work harnesses electric power from ion gradients established by capturing the carbon dioxide (CO2) from human breath. Upon localized exposure to CO2, this novel adaptation of reverse electrodialysis chemically generates ion gradients from a single initial solution uniformly distributed throughout the device instead of requiring the active circulation of two different external solutions. A thorough analysis of the relationship between electrical output and the concentration of carbon capture agent (monoethanolamine, MEA), the amount of CO2 captured, and the device geometry informs device design. The prototype device presented here harvests enough energy from a breath-generated ion gradient to power small electronic devices, such as a light-emitting diode (LED).
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Chimie
Language
  • English
Classification
Biotechnology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/309436
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