Journal article

The Eomyidae in Asia: Biogeography, diversity and dispersals

  • Kimura, Yuri Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0005, Japan / Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, ICTA-ICP. Edifici Z. Carrer de les Columnes, s/n., Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, ICTA-ICP. Edifici Z. Carrer de les Columnes, s/n., Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain.
  • Maridet, Olivier JURASSICA Museum, Route de Fontenais 21, CH-2900 Porrentruy, Switzerland / Département des Géosciences, Université de Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 6, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.
  • Kalthoff, Daniela C. Department of Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Mörs, Thomas Department of Palaeobiology, Swedish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Tomida, Yukimitsu Department of Geology and Paleontology, National Museum of Nature and Science, 4-1-1 Amakubo, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0005, Japan.
Show more…
    2020
Published in:
  • Fossil Imprint. - 2020, vol. 76, no. 1, p. 181-200
English In Asia, the first find of an eomyid rodent was reported almost one century after the first studies of the family Eomyidae in North America and Europe. Since then, eomyid rodents have been increasingly found in Asia particularly over the past two decades. Here, we review the Asian record of this family at the genus level. Currently, 22 species within 14 genera were reported from Asia, including seven endemic genera and rare materials of apeomyine eomyids. Eomyids emphasize the palaeogeographic importance of Asia in considering intercontinental dispersal events of small mammals. With newly compiled data for Asian eomyids, we also compare genus-level diversity trends through time among North America, Europe, and Asia. Despite data standardizations limited with respect to potential biases in the fossil record, we found that the Asian eomyid diversity closely follows ecological shifts induced by climate changes. In general, Asian eomyid genera disappeared earlier than their European counterparts. We suggest that this pattern is not dictated by differences in the quality of the fossil record and is related to the expansion of drier habitats over large areas of Asia.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Géosciences
Language
  • English
Classification
Paleontology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/308887
Statistics

Document views: 10 File downloads:
  • Kimura_Casanovas-Vilar_Maridet_et_al_2020.pdf: 3