Journal article

Knowledge of results during vertical jump testing: an effective method to increase the performance but not the consistency of vertical jumps

  • García-Ramos, Amador Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada , Granada, Spain - Department of Sports Sciences and Physical Conditioning, Faculty of Education, Catholic University of the Most Holy Conception , Concepción, Chile
  • Janicijevic, Danica Faculty of Sport and Physical Education, the Research Centre, University of Belgrade , Belgrade, Serbia
  • Cobo-Font, Juande Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada , Granada, Spain
  • Marcos-Frutos, Daniel Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada , Granada, Spain
  • Fernandes, John F. T. Sport, Exercise and Well-being Arena, Hartpury University , Hartpury, UK
  • Taube, Wolfgang Department of Neurosciences and Movement Sciences, University of Fribourg , Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada , Granada, Spain
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    22.06.2020
Published in:
  • Sports Biomechanics. - 2020, vol. 0, no. 0, p. 1–13
English This study aimed to determine whether the provision of jump height feedback (knowledge of result; KR) can increase the performance and the consistency of output variables. In a randomised order, sixteen participants performed six squat or countermovement jumps (three from a 90º knee angle and three from a self-preferred knee angle) with or without KR over four sessions. The provision of KR significantly increased peak force (p = 0.046, 1.83%), mean force (p = 0.037, 1.45%), peak velocity (p < 0.001, 3.71%), mean velocity (p = 0.004, 3.44%), peak power (p < 0.001, 4.22%) and mean power (p = 0.001, 4.69%). A high within-session reliability was observed for all variables (coefficient of variation [CV] ≤ 5.62%, intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.95). No systematic differences in reliability were detected between the jumps performed without KR (CV = 3.00 ± 1.38%, ICC = 0.97 ± 0.03) and with KR (CV = 3.04 ± 1.49%, ICC = 0.97 ± 0.04). These results suggest that the provision of jump height feedback during vertical jump testing is effective to enhance vertical jump performance but it does not reduce the variability between jumps.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Médecine
Language
  • English
Classification
Sports sciences
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/308702
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