Journal article

Countermovement jump training is more effective than drop jump training in enhancing jump height in non-professional female volleyball players

  • Ruffieux, Jan Department of Neurosciences and Movement Sciences, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Wälchli, Michael Department of Neurosciences and Movement Sciences, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Kim, Kyung-Min Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, United States
  • Taube, Wolfgang Department of Neurosciences and Movement Sciences, Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
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    2020
Published in:
  • Frontiers in Physiology. - 2020, vol. 11
English The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of countermovement jump (CMJ) and drop jump (DJ) training on the volleyball-specific jumping ability of non-professional female volleyball players. For that purpose, 26 female volleyball players (15–32 years) were assigned to either a CMJ (20.4 ± 3.1 years, 171.0 ± 3.0 cm) or a DJ training group (22.0 ± 4.4 years, 168.2 ± 5.0 cm), which performed a six-week jump training (two sessions per week, 60 jumps per session). Each group performed 20% of the jumps in the jump type of the other group in order to minimize the influence of enhanced motor coordination on the differences between groups regarding the improvements of jump performance. Before and after the training, jump height was assessed in four jump types, including the trained and volleyball-specific jump types. Although both training forms substantially improved jump height, the CMJ training was significantly more effective in all jump types (17 vs. 7% on average; p < 0.001). This suggests that, at least for non-professional female volleyball players and a training duration of six weeks, training with a high percentage of CMJs is more effective than one with a high percentage of DJs. We hypothesize that this might be related to the slower stretch-shortening cycle during CMJs, which seems to be more specific for these players and tasks. These findings should support volleyball coaches in designing optimal jump trainings.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Médecine
Language
  • English
Classification
Sports sciences
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/308699
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