Journal article

Scientists’ warning on invasive alien species

  • Pyšek, Petr Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Botany, Department of Invasion Ecology Průhonice CZ‐252 43 Czech Republic - Department of Ecology, Faculty of Science, Charles University Viničná 7 Prague CZ‐128 44 Czech Republic - Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa
  • Hulme, Philip E. Bio‐Protection Research Centre, Lincoln University Canterbury New Zealand
  • Simberloff, Dan Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee Knoxville TN U.S.A.
  • Bacher, Sven Department of Biology, University of Fribourg Fribourg Switzerland
  • Blackburn, Tim M. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa - Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research, Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London London WC1E 6BT U.K. - Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park London NW1 4RY U.K.
  • Carlton, James T. Maritime Studies Program, Williams College – Mystic Seaport 75 Greenmanville Mystic CT 06355 U.S.A.
  • Dawson, Wayne Department of Biosciences, Durham University, South Road Durham DH1 3LE U.K.
  • Essl, Franz Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa - Division of Conservation Biology, Vegetation and Landscape Ecology, Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna Vienna Austria
  • Foxcroft, Llewellyn C. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa - Conservation Services, South African National Parks Private Bag X402 Skukuza 1350 South Africa
  • Genovesi, Piero Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa - ISPRAInstitute for Environmental Protection and Research and Chair IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group Rome Italy
  • Jeschke, Jonathan M. Leibniz‐Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) Müggelseedamm 310 Berlin 12587 Germany - Institute of Biology, Freie Universität Berlin Königin‐Luise‐Str. 1‐3 Berlin 14195 Germany - Berlin‐Brandenburg Institute of Advanced Biodiversity Research (BBIB) Königin‐Luise‐Str. 2‐4 Berlin 14195 Germany
  • Kühn, Ingolf Department Community Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ Theodor‐Lieser‐Str. 4 Halle 06120 Germany - Geobotany & Botanical Garden, Martin Luther University Halle‐Wittenberg Am Kirchtor 1 Halle 06108 Germany - German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (i, Div) Halle‐Jena‐Leipzig Deutscher Platz 5e Leipzig 04103 Germany
  • Liebhold, Andrew M. US Forest Service Northern Research Station 180 Canfield St. Morgantown West Virginia U.S.A. - Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague Prague CZ‐165 00 Czech Republic
  • Mandrak, Nicholas E. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Toronto 1265 Military Trail Toronto Ontario M1C 1A4 Canada
  • Meyerson, Laura A. Department of Natural Resources Science, The University of Rhode Island Kingston Rhode Island 02881 U.S.A.
  • Pauchard, Aníbal Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad de Concepción Concepción Chile - Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity Santiago Chile
  • Pergl, Jan Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Botany, Department of Invasion Ecology Průhonice CZ‐252 43 Czech Republic
  • Roy, Helen E. U.K. Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Wallingford OX10 8BB U.K.
  • Seebens, Hanno Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre (SBi, K‐F) Senckenberganlage 25 Frankfurt am Main 60325 Germany
  • Kleunen, Mark Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Konstanz Universitätsstrasse 10 Constance 78457 Germany - Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Taizhou University Taizhou 318000 China
  • Vilà, Montserrat Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD‐CSIC) Avd. Américo Vespucio 26 Isla de la Cartuja, Sevilla 41092 Spain - Department of Plant Biology and Ecology, University of Sevilla Sevilla Spain
  • Wingfield, Michael J. Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI)University of Pretoria Pretoria South Africa
  • Richardson, David M. Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University Matieland 7602 South Africa
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    25.06.2020
Published in:
  • Biological Reviews. - 2020, p. brv.12627
English Biological invasions are a global consequence of an increasingly connected world and the rise in human population size. The numbers of invasive alien species – the subset of alien species that spread widely in areas where they are not native, affecting the environment or human livelihoods – are increasing. Synergies with other global changes are exacerbating current invasions and facilitating new ones, thereby escalating the extent and impacts of invaders. Invasions have complex and often immense long‐term direct and indirect impacts. In many cases, such impacts become apparent or problematic only when invaders are well established and have large ranges. Invasive alien species break down biogeographic realms, affect native species richness and abundance, increase the risk of native species extinction, affect the genetic composition of native populations, change native animal behaviour, alter phylogenetic diversity across communities, and modify trophic networks. Many invasive alien species also change ecosystem functioning and the delivery of ecosystem services by altering nutrient and contaminant cycling, hydrology, habitat structure, and disturbance regimes. These biodiversity and ecosystem impacts are accelerating and will increase further in the future. Scientific evidence has identified policy strategies to reduce future invasions, but these strategies are often insufficiently implemented. For some nations, notably Australia and New Zealand, biosecurity has become a national priority. There have been long‐term successes, such as eradication of rats and cats on increasingly large islands and biological control of weeds across continental areas. However, in many countries, invasions receive little attention. Improved international cooperation is crucial to reduce the impacts of invasive alien species on biodiversity, ecosystem services, and human livelihoods. Countries can strengthen their biosecurity regulations to implement and enforce more effective management strategies that should also address other global changes that interact with invasions.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Biologie
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/308640
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