Journal article

Effects of monoamines and antidepressants on astrocyte physiology: implications for monoamine hypothesis of depression

  • Marathe, Swananda V. Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
  • D’almeida, Priyal L. Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
  • Virmani, Garima Centre for Neuroscience, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
  • Bathini, Praveen Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland - Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health SA, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Alberi, Lavinia Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland - Swiss Integrative Center for Human Health SA, Fribourg, Switzerland
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    01.01.2018
Published in:
  • Journal of Experimental Neuroscience. - 2018, vol. 12
English Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common neuropsychiatric disorders affecting over one-fifth of the population worldwide. Owing to our limited understanding of the pathophysiology of MDD, the quest for finding novel antidepressant drug targets is severely impeded. Monoamine hypothesis of MDD provides a robust theoretical framework, forming the core of a large jigsaw puzzle, around which we must look for the vital missing pieces. Growing evidence suggests that the glial loss observed in key regions of the limbic system in depressed patients, at least partly, accounts for the structural and cognitive manifestations of MDD. Studies in animal models have subsequently hinted at the possibility that the glial atrophy may play a causative role in the precipitation of depressive symptoms. Antidepressants as well as monoamine neurotransmitters exert profound effects on the gene expression and metabolism in astrocytes. This raises an intriguing possibility that the astrocytes may play a central role alongside neurons in the behavioral effects of antidepressant drugs. In this article, we discuss the gene expression and metabolic changes brought about by antidepressants in astrocytes, which could be of relevance to synaptic plasticity and behavioral effects of antidepressant treatments.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Médecine 3ème année
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/307283
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