Journal article

Extended-spectrum β-lactamase/AmpC- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in animals: a threat for humans?

  • Madec, Jean-Yves Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire (Anses), Unité Antibiorésistance et Virulence Bactériennes?Université de Lyon, France
  • Haenni, Marissa Agence Nationale de Sécurité Sanitaire (Anses), Unité Antibiorésistance et Virulence Bactériennes?Université de Lyon, France
  • Nordmann, Patrice Emerging Antibiotic Resistance Unit, Medical and Molecular Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Science, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - INSERM European Unit (LEA Paris, France), University of Fribourg, Switzerland - University of Lausanne and University Hospital Centre, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Poirel, Laurent Emerging Antibiotic Resistance Unit, Medical and Molecular Microbiology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Science, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - INSERM European Unit (LEA Paris, France), University of Fribourg, Switzerland
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    01.11.2017
Published in:
  • Clinical Microbiology and Infection. - 2017, vol. 23, no. 11, p. 826–833
English There has been a great and long-term concern that extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae occurring in animals may constitute a public-health issue. A large number of factors with complex interrelations contribute to the spread of those bacteria among animals and humans. ESBL/AmpC- or carbapenemase-encoding genes are most often located on mobile genetic elements favouring their dissemination. Some shared reservoirs of ESBL/AmpC or carbapenemase genes, plasmids or clones have been identified and suggest cross-transmissions. Even though exposure to animals is regarded as a risk factor, evidence for a direct transfer of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria from animals to humans through close contacts is limited. Nonetheless, the size of the commensal ESBL/AmpC reservoir in non-human sources is dramatically rising. This may constitute an indirect risk to public health by increasing the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up ESBL/AmpC/carbapenemase genes. The extent to which food contributes to potential transmission of ESBL/AmpC producers to humans is also not well established. Overall, events leading to the occurrence of ESBL/AmpC- and carbapenemase-encoding genes in animals seem very much multifactorial. The impact of animal reservoirs on human health still remains debatable and unclear; nonetheless, there are some examples of direct links that have been identified.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Médecine 3ème année
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/306543
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