Journal article

Biodistribution, clearance, and long‐term fate of clinically relevant nanomaterials

  • Bourquin, Joël Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Milosevic, Ana Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Hauser, Daniel Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Lehner, Roman Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Blank, Fabian Respiratory Medicine, Department of Biomedical Research, University of Bern, Switzerland
  • Petri-Fink, Alke Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland - Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara Adolphe Merkle InstituteUniversity of Fribourg, Switzerland
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    01.02.2018
Published in:
  • Advanced Materials. - 2018
English Realization of the immense potential of nanomaterials for biomedical applications will require a thorough understanding of how they interact with cells, tissues, and organs. There is evidence that, depending on their physicochemical properties and subsequent interactions, nanomaterials are indeed taken up by cells. However, the subsequent release and/or intracellular degradation of the materials, transfer to other cells, and/or translocation across tissue barriers are still poorly understood. The involvement of these cellular clearance mechanisms strongly influences the long-term fate of used nanomaterials, especially if one also considers repeated exposure. Several nanomaterials, such as liposomes and iron oxide, gold, or silica nanoparticles, are already approved by the American Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials; however, there is still a huge gap of knowledge concerning their fate in the body. Herein, clinically relevant nanomaterials, their possible modes of exposure, as well as the biological barriers they must overcome to be effective are reviewed. Furthermore, the biodistribution and kinetics of nanomaterials and their modes of clearance are discussed, knowledge of the long-term fates of a selection of nanomaterials is summarized, and the critical points that must be considered for future research are addressed.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Chimie
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/306478
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