Journal article

Heart rate never lies: interventional cardiologist and Braude’s quote revised

  • Cook, Stéphane Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Stauffer, Jean-Christophe Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Goy, Jean-Jacques Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Graf, Denis Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Puricel, Serban Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Frobert, Aurélien Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Muller, Olivier Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Togni, Mario Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Arroyo, Diego Department of Cardiology, University & Hospital, Fribourg, Switzerland
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    01.01.2016
Published in:
  • Open Heart. - 2016, vol. 3, no. 1, p. e000373
English Background Interventional cardiologists may be immune to stress, allowing them to perform complex percutaneous interventions under pressure.Objectives To assess heart rate (HR) variations as a surrogate marker of stress of interventional cardiologists during percutaneous cardiac procedures and in every-day life.Design This is a single-centre observational study including a total of six male interventional cardiologists performing coronary interventions and pacemaker implantations. Participants were asked to record their HR with the Apple Watch Device during procedures, every-day life and control activities such as outpatient consultations, sport, marital conflicts and sexual intercourse.Results Average daily HR was 88±17 bpm. During work days, HR increased significantly during procedures (90±17 bpm) compared with days outside the cathlab (87±17 bpm, p=0.02). The average HR was higher during a regular week working (88±16 bpm) compared with weekends off (84±18 bpm, p=0.002). Complex cardiac procedures were associated with higher HR up to 122 bpm. Peak HR were higher during physical exertion. Of note, participants complained of hypersexuality and mania after night shifts.Conclusions Work and especially percutaneous cardiac procedures increase HR independently of physical exertion suggesting that interventional cardiologists experience mental stress and emotions.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Médecine 3ème année
Language
  • English
Classification
Clinical medicine
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/304695
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