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The thermic effect of sugar-free Red Bull: Do the non-caffeine bioactive ingredients in energy drinks play a role?

  • Miles-Chan, Jennifer L. Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular and Metabolic Physiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Charrière, Nathalie Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular and Metabolic Physiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Grasser, Erik Konrad Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular and Metabolic Physiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Montani, Jean-Pierre Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular and Metabolic Physiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Dulloo, Abdul G. Laboratory of Integrative Cardiovascular and Metabolic Physiology, Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
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    01.01.2015
Published in:
  • Obesity. - 2015, vol. 23, no. 1, p. 16–19
English Objective: Consumption of energy drinks is increasing amongst athletes and the general public. By virtue of their bioactive ingredients (including caffeine, taurine, glucuronolactone, and B-group vitamins) and paucity of calories, sugar-free “diet” versions of these drinks could be a useful aid for weight maintenance. Yet little is known about the acute influence of these drinks, and specifically the role of the cocktail of non-caffeine ingredients, on resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation. Therefore, the metabolic impact of sugar-free Red Bull (sfRB) to a comparable amount of caffeine was compared.Methods: REE and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured in eight healthy young men by ventilated-hood indirect calorimetry for 30 min baseline and 2 h following ingestion of 355 ml of either: sfRB +  placebo, water + 120 mg caffeine, or water + placebo, according to a randomized cross-over design.Results: sfRB and water + caffeine both increased REE to the same degree (+4%). Additionally, sfRB briefly increased RQ. Water + caffeine had no effect on RQ relative to water + placebo.Conclusions: sfRB enhanced thermogenesis and marginally shifted RQ to favor carbohydrate oxidation. The stimulatory effects of sfRB on REE are mimicked by water + caffeine, indicating that the auxiliary ingredients do not influence this thermic effect. The metabolic effects of sfRB are primarily due to caffeine alone.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Médecine 3ème année, Département de Médecine
Language
  • English
Classification
Nutrition and Dietetics
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/304240
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