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Comparison of the toxicity of diesel exhaust produced by bio- and fossil diesel combustion in human lung cells in vitro

  • Steiner, Sandro Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Czerwinski, Jan Bern University for Applied Sciences, Switzerland
  • Comte, Pierre Bern University for Applied Sciences, Switzerland
  • Popovicheva, Olga Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Russia
  • Kireeva, Elena Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Russia
  • Müller, Loretta University of Bern, Department of Clinical Research, Switzerland
  • Heeb, Norbert EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Switzerland
  • Mayer, Andreas TTM, Technik Thermischer Maschinen, Switzerland
  • Petri-Fink, Alke Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - University of Bern, Department of Clinical Research, Switzerland
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    01.12.2013
Published in:
  • Atmospheric Environment. - 2013, vol. 81, p. 380–388
English Alternative fuels are increasingly combusted in diesel- and gasoline engines and the contribution of such exhausts to the overall air pollution is on the rise. Recent findings on the possible adverse effects of biodiesel exhaust are contradictive, at least partly resulting from the various fuel qualities, engine types and different operation conditions that were tested. However, most of the studies are biased by undesired interactions between the exhaust samples and biological culture media. We here report how complete, freshly produced exhausts from fossil diesel (B0), from a blend of 20% rapeseed-methyl ester (RME) and 80% fossil diesel (B20) and from pure rapeseed methyl ester (B100) affect a complex 3D cellular model of the human airway epithelium in vitro by exposing the cells at the air–liquid interface. The induction of pro-apoptotic and necrotic cell death, cellular morphology, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory responses were assessed. Compared to B0 exhaust, B20 exhaust decreased oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses, whereas B100 exhaust, depending on exposure duration, decreased oxidative stress but increased pro-inflammatory responses. The effects are only very weak and given the compared to fossil diesel higher ecological sustainability of biodiesel, it appears that – at least RME – can be considered a valuable alternative to pure fossil diesel.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Chimie
Language
  • English
Classification
Chemistry
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/303392
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