Journal article

Cognitive control of language production in bilinguals involves a partly independent process within the domain-general cognitive control network: Evidence from task-switching and electrical brain activity

  • Magezi, David A. Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Khateb, Asaid Laboratory of Experimental Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland - Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities, Department of Learning Disabilities, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Israel
  • Mouthon, Michaël Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - Laboratory of Experimental Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Spierer, Lucas Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Annoni, Jean-Marie Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Sciences, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - Laboratory of Experimental Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland - Neurology Unit, Hospital of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
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    08.05.2012
Published in:
  • Brain and Language. - 2012, vol. 122, no. 1, p. 55–63
English In highly proficient, early bilinguals, behavioural studies of the cost of switching language or task suggest qualitative differences between language control and domain-general cognitive control. By contrast, several neuroimaging studies have shown an overlap of the brain areas involved in language control and domain-general cognitive control. The current study measured both behavioural responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) from bilinguals who performed picture naming in single- or mixed-language contexts, as well as an alphanumeric categorisation task in single- or mixed-task context. Analysis of switch costs during the mixed-context conditions showed qualitative differences between language control and domain-general cognitive control. A 2 × 2 ANOVA of the ERPs, with domain (linguistic, alphanumeric) and context (single, mixed) as within-participant factors, revealed a significant interaction, which also suggests a partly independent language-control mechanism. Source estimations revealed the neural basis of this mechanism to be in bilateral frontal–temporal areas.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Médecine 3ème année
Language
  • English
Classification
Biology
License
License undefined
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Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/302425
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