Journal article

Engineering spin propagation across a hybrid organic/inorganic interface using a polar layer

  • Schulz, Leander Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Nuccio, Laura Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Willis, M. Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Desai, P. Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Shakya, P. Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Kreouzis, T. Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Malik, Vivek Kumar Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Bernhard, Christian Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, Switzerland
  • Pratt, F. L. ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK
  • Morley, N. A. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, UK
  • Suter, A. Laboratory for Muon-Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • Nieuwenhuys, G. J. Laboratory for Muon-Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • Prokscha, T. Laboratory for Muon-Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • Morenzoni, E. Laboratory for Muon-Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, Switzerland
  • Gillin, W. P. Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
  • Drew, Alan J. Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, University of Fribourg, Switzerland - Queen Mary University of London, School of Physics, UK
Show more…
    18.01.2011
Published in:
  • Nature Materials. - 2011, vol. 10, p. 39–44
English Spintronics has shown a remarkable and rapid development, for example from the initial discovery of giant magnetoresistance in spin valves (Baibich, M. N. et al. Giant magnetoresistance of (001)Fe/(001)Cr magnetic superlattices. Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 2472–2475, 1988) to their ubiquity in hard-disk read heads in a relatively short time. However, the ability to fully harness electron spin as another degree of freedom in semiconductor devices has been slower to take off. One future avenue that may expand the spintronic technology base is to take advantage of the flexibility intrinsic to organic semiconductors (OSCs), where it is possible to engineer and control their electronic properties and tailor them to obtain new device concepts (Bergenti, I. et al. Spin polarised electrodes for organic light emitting diodes. Org. Electron. 5, 309–314, 2004). Here we show that we can control the spin polarization of extracted charge carriers from an OSC by the inclusion of a thin interfacial layer of polar material. The electric dipole moment brought about by this layer shifts the OSC highest occupied molecular orbital with respect to the Fermi energy of the ferromagnetic contact. This approach allows us full control of the spin band appropriate for charge-carrier extraction, opening up new spintronic device concepts for future exploitation.
Faculty
Faculté des sciences et de médecine
Department
Département de Physique
Language
  • English
Classification
Physics
License
License undefined
Identifiers
Persistent URL
https://folia.unifr.ch/unifr/documents/301867
Statistics

Document views: 8 File downloads:
  • sch_esp.pdf: 1